Rock blasting begins on Raiders stadium site

Friday, construction crews were literally breaking ground with a six-week rock blasting project, setting the foundation for the soon-to-be Las Vegas Raiders stadium. (Austin Turner / FOX5)

Two months ago, the Raiders officially broke ground with their ceremony on Russell Road, but Friday, construction crews were literally breaking that ground with a six-week rock blasting project, setting the foundation for the soon-to-be Las Vegas Raiders stadium.

"It's kind of like dynamite, like boom, right," Stadium Authority Board member Tommy White said. "You could feel the ground tremble, all the way across from where we were standing."

On the second day of rock blasting on, White, show is also the Laborers Union Local 872 President, moved some dirt with the push of a button.

"Holding that detonator in your hands make you realize how powerful it really is, when you see that mound of dirt pop up, it's like how many pools can we dig like this," joked White.

These explosions have been scheduled take place every day for nearly two months. Construction crews planned to drill 300 holes per day with the goal to move over 850,000 cubic yards of dirt.

"For us to guarantee the duration of our excavation, you can't essentially dig out rock. So that's what led us to today, which is blasting the site," McCarthy Project Manager, Paul Dudzinski said.

One hundred to 150 hard hats are on the site every day, and crews said they need to dig nearly two and a half football fields, 30-feet deep for the stadium field along with the field tray.

"The stadium field elevation will be roughly 25 feet below the grade you see today,” Dudzinski said. “The reason for that is you'll enter the on-grade at the main concourse, you'll go down to your lower bowl seats or you'll go up to your upper bowl seats."

Project staff said there are several vibration monitors on the site to ensure that blasts aren't too loud or disruptive to nearby business of traffic.

"We make sure that none of the blasts are over an allowable vibration that would actually effect any of the surrounding buildings, any of the underground utilities, the bridge we're standing on, anything like that," Dudzinski said.

"When you see it really coming out of the ground, people's eyes are really going to open up about what Las Vegas is going to turn into," White said.

Copyright 2018 KVVU (KVVU Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

Sports Reporter/Anchor