WLFD/Facebook

(Western Lakes Fire District/Facebook)

LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -- With summer approaching and the weather heating up, fire departments are warning residents about the dangers of leaving hand sanitizer in hot cars.

The Western Lakes Fire District in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, on Thursday shared a warning on Facebook with an image of a burnt vehicle door to show what can happen when hand sanitizer is left in a hot vehicle.

"We’ve chatted in the past about clear water bottles being kept in your vehicle when the weather is warm. That still holds true and so does hand sanitizer! By its nature, most hand sanitizer is alcohol-based and therefore flammable. Keeping it in your car during hot weather, exposing it to sun causing magnification of light through the bottle,----and particularly being next to open flame while smoking in vehicles or grilling while enjoying this weekend----can lead to disaster," Western Lakes Fire District said in the Facebook post.

While the Western Lakes Fire District's post has gone viral, some question the validity of it.

The Kansas City Star notes that “fact-checkers said the internal temperature of car needs to reach 572 degrees Fahrenheit for a bottle of hand sanitizer to combust, according to The Poynter Institute.”

According to Poynter, a study by Arizona State University that looked at cars parked in triple-digit summer heat found temperatures topped out around 160 F (71.11 C). 

Copyright 2020 KVVU (KVVU Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved

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