Las Vegas abortion clinics already see surge in patients, calls

Abortion clinics across Las Vegas have already experienced a surge in calls and uptick patients since the overturning of Roe V. Wade.
Published: Jun. 27, 2022 at 9:07 PM PDT
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LAS VEGAS, Nev. (FOX5) - Abortion clinics across Las Vegas have already experienced a surge in calls and uptick patients since the overturning of Roe V. Wade, leading to concerns over the ability of providers to handle thousands more patients.

According to Planned Parenthood, the organization expects 10,000 patients to seek appointments and treatments in Nevada, Colorado and New Mexico. 26 states could seek to ban or restrict abortions.

Since Friday, A to Z Women’s Center already saw up to 12 patients from Idaho, Utah and Arizona.

“Many of them had been scheduled to have their procedure done in Arizona. But when they showed up on Friday morning to have that procedure done, they were told, ‘Sorry, we can’t do it.’ So they scrambled and drove here and had the procedure done here in Las Vegas,” said Dr. Charles Browne, who owns the clinic. The clinic had already seen an uptick in patients from Texas following restrictions passed this spring, and braced for a surge in patients, extending clinic hours into the weekend.

“Many of these patients call in tears. It’s really too difficult to have somebody call and want to be seen and say to them, ‘Sorry, we can’t see you.’ Right now we haven’t turned anyone away. But as more and more calls come in, there may be a breaking point,” Browne said, concerned about the influx of patients among Nevada’s limited providers.

The Wild West Access Fund is working to educate Nevadans on their medical options, to help free up space for patients.

“I think that we have options and a lot of public education to do right now. There’s a lot of ways for people who are under 10 weeks to get care from the comfort of their own home. So if you’re in Nevada, and you’re under 10 weeks, that would be a great way to keep the clinics open for people that are maybe a little bit further along,” said Macy Haverda, president of WWAF.