Dick's Sporting Goods joins gun debate after announcing it will - FOX5 Vegas - KVVU

Dick's Sporting Goods joins gun debate after announcing it will stop selling assault-style rifles

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DICK’S Sporting Goods stores has landed itself in the middle of the gun control debate. DICK’S Sporting Goods stores has landed itself in the middle of the gun control debate.

Dick’s Sporting Goods stores has landed itself in the middle of the gun control debate. On Wednesday, the company’s CEO said the company is taking its gun regulations one step further.

“We were so disturbed and saddened by what happened in Parkland,” Edward Stark, Dick’s Sporting Goods CEO said. “We said 'we need to do something.'”

Stark said the company will no longer sell high capacity magazines in its stores, and will no longer sell guns to anyone under 21.

“Everybody talks about thoughts and prayers going out ... That’s great, but that doesn’t really do anything. We felt that we needed to take a stand.”

It’s not the first time Dick’s Sporting Goods has taken a stand. The company had already removed assault-style rifles from all Dick’s stores after the Sandy Hook massacre, now the assault-style rifles are coming out of the company’s Field and Stream stores.

The store’s decision has been as polarizing an issue as the gun debate itself.

“I think it’s a great idea,” Margaret, a valley woman who supports Dick’s decision said.

“It’s not the firearm that is the problem,” Dennis Higgs, a Canadian tourist said. “It’s the guy behind it.”

“If that (decision) can take away these rifles being in the wrong hands,” William, a valley man, said. “I’m for it, but that is not going to happen.”

William is an NRA supporter and gun owner and he strongly believes in the right to bear arms, “but not for the purposes as we have seen for the individuals that take it and destroy somebodies life,” William said. “I’m against that, but it’s my gun and you can’t take it away from me.”

He said is not sure if removing different guns from shelves will make a difference.

“Somewhere, somebody has one and somebody want to sell one ... somebody wants to buy one.”

He’s not alone in that thought.

“This push for a weapons ban is also coming from a largely ignorant, yet understandably empathetic place,” Iain Alexander, another valley resident said. “Simply put, you cannot legislate evil. You can only enable yourself and others to be prepared to face such evil. And the 'ban' would only hurt the law abiding and innocent.”

Meanwhile, others said they hope more stores follow suit.

“Anybody that has that type of weapon ... all they want to do is create chaos," a valley woman who did not want to be identified said.

One valley man said the gun itself is only one part of a larger issue.

“Video games and the internet play a large part in kids activity,” Omar Chambers said. “You can shoot at people, you can see humans falling, these things become embedded in your head and it becomes natural.”

Dick’s Sporting Goods was not the only store to make a decision on gun sales. Walmart announced it will raise the age to buy firearms in its stores to 21.

Walmart ended sales of modern sporting rifles, including the AR-15, in 2015.

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