Henderson Police shares a look inside its unique school shooting - FOX5 Vegas - KVVU

Henderson Police shares a look inside its unique school shooting simulator

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All police departments in the valley have reality based training, but only Henderson Police Department has a 300 degree simulator. (FOX5) All police departments in the valley have reality based training, but only Henderson Police Department has a 300 degree simulator. (FOX5)
LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -

All police departments in the valley have reality based training, but only Henderson Police Department has a 300 degree simulator.

The simulator has more than 700 different scenarios including school shootings. By the time an officer comes to the simulator he or she has already had hundreds of hours of training. 

"We start their training in the academy," Jeb Bozarth with Henderson Police's training bureau said. "We train our officers when they get there they need to go in. Our police department, and our valley trains that an immediate response to an active shooter is the only way to stop their heinous act. We just have to get inside and stop the threat."

The simulator trains officers to know what to look for when responding to things like school shootings, and teaches them to relay vital information to other first responders on scene. 

"One thing our officers have to learn is listen to gunfire, and even if your comrade is hit, you don't stop to check on them, you engage the shooter."

Officers said when mass casualty events, like Wednesday's shooting, happen, everyone has a cell phone, so relaying vital information to dispatch could be the difference between life and death.

"If they say what clothing, or honestly any info, this is important for your viewers to understand, the more intel we have, the better we can respond," Bozarth said. 

The simulation also corrects officers if they make a mistake by shocking them if they don't check surroundings, or don't engage a suspect. 

"The threat device is a device it shocks them, it hurts. If they don't do something, there is a consequence. It makes their blood pressure go up, which we need. We need you in the state you will be working in," Officer Donny King said. King is the lead officer in the use of force training and analysis unit. 

Henderson Police's training for these types of events goes beyond their simulator. For the past five years, they have worked closely with the Henderson Fire Department in the creation of Rescue Task Forces. 

"Everything has changed. After the shooting in Aurora, Colorado, we knew we had to work more closely with fire and medics. We had to get the patients who were hurt help more quickly," Bozarth said. 

The Rescue Task Force put an officer with medical response teams. The officer guards them as they go into these hot zones where an active shooter may still be. The officer guards the medics so they can triage and care for patients. 

"The reason for this is to eliminate the time for patients to bleed out," Tim Mckeever, Deputy Chief of Operations for the Henderson Police Department said. "Also these people who have life threatening injuries; it helps us get them to care as soon as possible."

McKeever said 1 October was the first time fire and police were able to use these Rescue Task Force units on a large scale. 

Henderson Police said they hope to never have to answer a call like the school shooting in Florida, but said they train like they will be.

"God forbid it were to happen here; our training makes it so we are better prepared to handle that threat," Bozarth said. 

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