State senator launches anti-bullying campaign - FOX5 Vegas - KVVU

State senator rallies students to prevent bullying

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Nevada state Sen. Barbara Cegavske shows an anti-bullying video to students at Coral Academy of Science in Las Vegas on Monday, Aug. 18. (Erik Ho/FOX5) Nevada state Sen. Barbara Cegavske shows an anti-bullying video to students at Coral Academy of Science in Las Vegas on Monday, Aug. 18. (Erik Ho/FOX5)
LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -

New clothes, new supplies, new friends and new teachers – the first day of school is something plenty of kids look forward to.

Unfortunately, for some students, the new school year is something to dread.

On Monday, a Nevada lawmaker kicked off a campaign designed to prevent bullying in Clark County Schools.

Dozens of students and parents came out to Coral Academy of Science in Las Vegas Monday evening to listen to state Sen. Barbara Cegavske tackle the tough subject.

"It's up to the parents and it's up to the kids. We can take care of this and we can control it," Cegavske said.

Cegavske is hoping a video which will be shown in every Clark County school this year, Let's Get Real, will give students the tools they need to overcome and prevent abuse.

"[It's] very proactive, and it's a way for kids to learn a little bit more and understand that they don't have to be bullied but they shouldn't be a bully," Cegavske said.

Cegavske said with a week remaining until the new school year begins, now is the time parents should be speaking with their kids about the issue.

"Talk to them about it – not to be the person who does it, and if it happens to you, you've got to report it," she said.

Parent Airth Colin is nervous about her daughter starting the sixth grade. She fears she'll be bullied as an underclassman.

"[I intend to keep] the line of communication open, constantly have dialog back and forth – ‘How was your day? What's going on with your friends? Who are you interacting with on a daily basis?'" Colin said.

Sarah Disalvo will be a senior this year. She said much of the bullying occurs online.

"Because you can do it without saying it to someone's face, and it's a lot easier, sadly, to bully someone online than in person and stooping to that level," she said. "It can be really dangerous and hurtful to people, and it can cause a lot of trauma as you're growing up and your brain is developing."

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