How to Keep Cold and Flu Infections Out of Your Life This Winter Season - FOX5 Vegas - KVVU

How to Keep Cold and Flu Infections Out of Your Life This Winter Season

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SOURCE UniFirst Corporation

WILMINGTON, Mass., Feb. 26, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- If you want to avoid catching a cold or the flu this winter season, keep yourself and your surroundings as hygienically clean as possible.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140226/NE72444 )

Although that can sound like a daunting task, it need not be with a slightly more conscious cleanliness effort. Keeping illness-causing organisms at bay can be largely accomplished by adopting three basic behaviors.

  1. Regularly wash your hands with soap and water
  2. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizers when soap and water are unavailable
  3. Keep common surfaces around you clean using such aids as microfiber cloths and mops

If you're going to focus on just one behavior to maintain as healthy a lifestyle as possible, it should be on keeping your hands clean because that's primarily how germs and viruses infect your body. They hitchhike rides on your hands and then wait for you to touch your nose, mouth, or eyes. At that point, it's all over. You're infected.

Everyone's hands, particularly during cold and flu seasons, are veritable germ factories, so keep them away from your face, says Dr. Sandra Fryhofer, an adjunct associate professor at Emory University School of Medicine. You should even think twice about your eating habits in order to remain cold and flu free, Dr. Fryhofer says.

"I try to bring something (to work) I can eat with a spoon or fork, rather than a sandwich I have to handle," Dr. Fryhofer told www.webmd.com. If not, be doubly sure to wash your hands prior to eating.

If soap and water are unavailable, the medical community has long advocated the use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers. But keep in mind that such sanitizers are only intended to kill bacteria and should not be used to clean your hands of traditional soiling, says Adam Soreff, Director of Marketing for UniFirst (www.unifirst.com), a leading provider of work uniforms and facility service products to businesses throughout the U.S. and Canada.

"Soap and water should be your first hand cleaning choice whenever readily available," Soreff says. "But in public areas, such as hallways, offices, and cafeterias, seek out alcohol-based hand sanitizer stations to help keep hands free of infectious organisms."

Hand sanitizers, Soreff notes should contain at least 60 percent alcohol to kill germs. "Anything less than that runs the risk of being ineffective."

GOJO Industries, the makers of Purell® Hand Sanitizer, offers this guidance to get maximum germ-killing action from sanitizers: "Place enough product in your palm to thoroughly cover your hands. Be sure to sanitize the front and backs of your hands, as well as between your fingers and under your nails. Rub hands together briskly until dry. No rinsing required. No towels needed."

During cold and flu season, you should also be particularly vigilant when touching common surfaces. That's because people who are already infected may have come in contact with those surfaces and left germs and viruses behind. So be wary when touching such things as door handles, computer keyboards, light switches, desks, and countertops. Even flooring can harbor infectious organisms which can hop aboard something you drop, such as a pen or paper clip.  

Several studies have determined that microfiber is better than cotton at capturing bacteria on common surfaces. For example, one conducted by the University of California, Davis Medical Center, compared the amount of bacteria picked up by a cotton-loop mop and by a microfiber mop. The cotton-loop mop reduced bacteria on the floors by 30%, whereas the microfiber mop reduced bacteria by 99%.

No matter what type mop or wipes, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advocates the regular cleaning, mopping, and disinfecting of all surfaces during cold and flu season. But don't forget to use only hygienically laundered mops and wipes when cleaning those surfaces, says UniFirst's Soreff. "Otherwise you run a greater risk of spreading infectious materials from one room to another, defeating the purpose of cleaning."

The bottom line: To stay healthy during the cold and flu season, always keep soap, sanitizers, and soiled surrounding surfaces front of mind.

About UniFirst

UniFirst (NYSE: UNF), a North American leader in the supply and servicing of uniforms, workwear, and protective clothing, outfits more than 1.5 million workers each business day. The company's most popular brands include UniWeave®, SofTwill®, UniWear®, and Armorex FR®. UniFirst also offers Facility Service program, including floor mats, mops, and restroom products. For more information, contact UniFirst at 800-455-7654 or visit www.unifirst.com.

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