Projects aimed at flood control in NW accelerated - FOX5 Vegas - KVVU

Projects aimed at flood control in NW accelerated

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A sign warns drivers of waters on a Las Vegas road after a flood in the area in this undated image. (File/FOX5) A sign warns drivers of waters on a Las Vegas road after a flood in the area in this undated image. (File/FOX5)
LAS VEGAS (FOX5) -

After recent flash floods in the northwest Las Vegas Valley, projects aimed at diverting the water have been accelerated, according to officials.

Ward 6 City Councilman Steven Ross was joined by other local, county and federal officials Wednesday to discuss efforts aimed at cleaning up after the floods, and plans to keep it from happening again.

Clark County Flood Control District Manager Gale Fraser said this has been an unprecedented summer for the Valley. He said that on Aug. 25, Kyle Canyon received 4.1 inches of rain. He said the entire Valley normally receives about four inches in a year.

The tremendous rain rushed out of the canyon and into a basin. When the basin filled, the water rushed down streets in northwest Las Vegas. Some of the roads were washed out, while others were clogged with debris and mud.

Ross said some people have called his office, claiming that the city has released water from the basin into the neighborhood. It's a claim he called false.

"The detention basins do not have a turn-on or turn-off valve that allow water to flow or stop flowing," Ross said. "The detention basins are built to release water at a slow decreased rate and stop flash floods."

Officials said projects aimed at diverting the water from the neighborhoods have been moved to the top of the list. The plans call for new, underground channels that connect to existing washes to move the water into the flood control system.

Ross said the projects should be complete within two years. He said funds for the projects were not slated to be available for another seven years, but recent events have prompted officials to move money around to cover the costs.

Surface debris should be cleared by the end of this week, according to Ross. He said crews have removed 135,000 cubic feet of mud and debris from roads and open channels in the area.

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