Police put extra 'eyes' on Henderson roads - FOX5 Vegas - KVVU

Police put extra 'eyes' on Henderson roads

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HENDERSON, NV (FOX5) -

The Henderson Police Department is rolling out new technology on some of its units to read license plates. The program, which launched about three weeks ago, has already netted one arrest.

Graham Miller, 30, was arrested Tuesday morning after an officer received an alert that the vehicle Miller was driving had been reported stolen. He is now being charged with possession of a stolen vehicle.

The department launched the Automated License Plate Recognition (ALPR) system in nine patrol vehicles in May. The system uses four digital cameras to photograph the license plate of cars and run those plates against a criminal database of stolen vehicles.

Officers have been testing and training on the system for several weeks, according to Henderson Police.

"I've recovered two stolen cars with it," said Ofc. Zane Simpson. "One left it abandoned in a parking lot and another, the owner recovered their own car and didn't call the police to tell them."

Drivers FOX5 spoke with called the program an interesting move.

"Maybe they'll find more stolen cars that way and I think it's great," said Dianna Harris, a Las Vegas resident.

Some, however, have their reservations about "big brother."

"Obviously, you don't want to be monitored 24/7 like that," said Seda Gerstl.

Simpson brushed off that thought, saying: "We're out recovering stolen cars. That's what we want to do. If your car got stolen, you'd want to recover it. I'm not going to do anything the with the information it's obtaining."

Boulder City has a similar plate reader program that has been running for nearly two years. The technology allows the cameras to read about 1,200 license plates per hour.

The ALPR system for the nine patrol cars in Henderson cost about $160,000. Henderson Police received a grant from the Department of Justice to pay for the installation.

The Henderson Police Department is rolling out new technology on some of its units to read license plates. The program, which launched about three weeks ago, has already netted one arrest.

Graham Miller, 30, was arrested Tuesday morning after an officer received an alert that the vehicle Miller was driving had been reported stolen. He is now being charged with possession of a stolen vehicle.

 

The department launched the Automated License Plate Recognition (ALPR) system in nine patrol vehicles last month. The system uses four digital cameras to photograph the license plate of cars and run those plates against a criminal database of stolen vehicles.

 

Officers have been testing and training on the system for several weeks, according to Henderson Police.

 

"I've recovered two stolen cars with it," said Ofc.. Zane Simpson. "One left it abandoned in a parking lot and another, the owner recovered their own car and didn't call the police to tell them."

 

Drivers FOX5 spoke with called the program an interesting move.

 

" Maybe they'll find more stolen cars that way and I think it's great," said Las Vegas resident Dianna Harris.

 

Some, however

The Henderson Police Department is rolling out new technology on some of its units to read license plates. The program, which launched about three weeks ago, has already netted one arrest.

Graham Miller, 30, was arrested Tuesday morning after an officer received an alert that the vehicle Miller was driving had been reported stolen. He is now being charged with possession of a stolen vehicle.

The department launched the Automated License Plate Recognition (ALPR) system in nine patrol vehicles last month. The system uses four digital cameras to photograph the license plate of cars and run those plates against a criminal database of stolen vehicles.

Officers have been testing and training on the system for several weeks, according to Henderson Police.

"I've recovered two stolen cars with it," said Ofc. Zane Simpson. "One left it abandoned in a parking lot and another, the owner recovered their own car and didn't call the police to tell them."

Drivers FOX5 spoke with called the program an interesting move.

" Maybe they'll find more stolen cars that way and I think it's great," said Las Vegas resident Dianna Harris.

Some, however, have their reservations about "big brother."

" Obviously, you don't want to be monitored 24/7 like that," said Seda Gerstl.

Simpson brushed off that thought, saying: "We're out recovering stolen cars. That's what we want to do. If your car got stolen, you'd want to recover it. I'm not going to do anything the with the information it's obtaining."

Boulder City has a similar plate reader program that has been running for nearly two years. The technology allows the cameras to read about 1,200 license plates per minute.

The ALPR system for the nine patrol cars in Henderson cost about $160,000. Henderson Police received a grant from the Department of Justice to pay for the installation.

, have their reservations about "big brother."

 

" Obviously, you don't want to be monitored 24/7 like that," said Seda Gerstl.

 

Simpson brushed off that thought, saying: "We're out recovering stolen cars. That's what we want to do. If your car got stolen, you'd want to recover it. I'm not going to do anything the with the information it's obtaining."

 

Boulder City has a similar plate reader program that has been running for nearly two years. The technology allows the cameras to read about 1,200 license plates per minute.

The ALPR system for the nine patrol cars in Henderson cost about $160,000. Henderson Police received a grant from the Department of Justice to pay for the installation.

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